SEC Filings

10-Q
MEDTRONIC PLC filed this Form 10-Q on 09/01/2017
Entire Document
 
Medtronic plc
Notes to Consolidated Financial Statements
(Unaudited)


Financial Instruments Not Measured at Fair Value
At July 28, 2017, the estimated fair value of the Company’s Senior Notes, including the current portion, was $30.9 billion compared to a principal value of $28.9 billion. At April 28, 2017, the estimated fair value was $30.4 billion compared to a principal value of $28.9 billion. The fair value was estimated using quoted market prices for the publicly registered Senior Notes, which are classified as Level 2 within the fair value hierarchy. The fair values and principal values consider the terms of the related debt and exclude the impacts of debt discounts and derivative/hedging activity.
8. Derivatives and Currency Exchange Risk Management
The Company uses operational and economic hedges, as well as currency exchange rate derivative contracts and interest rate derivative instruments, to manage the impact of currency exchange and interest rate changes on earnings and cash flows. In addition, the Company uses cross currency interest rate swaps to manage currency risk related to certain debt. In order to minimize earnings and cash flow volatility resulting from currency exchange rate changes, the Company enters into derivative instruments, principally forward currency exchange rate contracts. These contracts are designed to hedge anticipated foreign currency transactions and changes in the value of specific assets and liabilities. At inception of the contract, the derivative is designated as either a freestanding derivative or a cash flow hedge. The primary currencies of the derivative instruments are the Euro and Japanese Yen. The Company does not enter into currency exchange rate derivative contracts for speculative purposes. The gross notional amount of all currency exchange rate derivative instruments outstanding was $11.8 billion and $10.8 billion at July 28, 2017 and April 28, 2017, respectively.
The information that follows explains the various types of derivatives and financial instruments used by the Company, reasons the Company uses such instruments, and the impact such instruments have on the Company’s consolidated balance sheets, statements of income, and statements of cash flows.
Freestanding Derivative Contracts
Freestanding derivative contracts are used to offset the Company’s exposure to the change in value of specific foreign currency denominated assets and liabilities and to offset variability of cash flows associated with forecasted transactions denominated in foreign currencies. These derivatives are not designated as hedges, and therefore, changes in the value of these contracts are recognized in earnings, thereby offsetting the current earnings effect of the related change in value of foreign currency denominated assets, liabilities, and cash flows. The gross notional amount of these contracts outstanding at July 28, 2017 and April 28, 2017 was $5.4 billion and $4.9 billion, respectively.
The amounts and classification of the losses in the consolidated statements of income related to derivative instruments, not designated as hedging instruments, for the three months ended July 28, 2017 and July 29, 2016 were as follows:
 
 
 
 
Three months ended
(in millions)
 
Classification
 
July 28, 2017
 
July 29, 2016
Currency exchange rate contracts losses
 
Other expense, net
 
$
31

 
$
3

Cash Flow Hedges
Currency Exchange Rate Risk
Forward contracts designated as cash flow hedges are designed to hedge the variability of cash flows associated with forecasted transactions denominated in a foreign currency that will take place in the future. For derivative instruments that are designated and qualify as a cash flow hedge, the effective portion of the gain or loss on the derivative instrument is reported as a component of accumulated other comprehensive loss. The effective portion of the gain or loss on the derivative instrument is reclassified into earnings and is included in other expense, net in the consolidated statements of income in the same period or periods during which the hedged transaction affects earnings.
No gains or losses relating to ineffectiveness of cash flow hedges were recognized in earnings during the three months ended July 28, 2017 and July 29, 2016. No components of the hedge contracts were excluded in the measurement of hedge ineffectiveness and no hedges were derecognized or discontinued during the three months ended July 28, 2017 and July 29, 2016. The gross notional amount of these contracts, designated as cash flow hedges, outstanding at July 28, 2017 and April 28, 2017, was $6.3 billion and $5.8 billion, respectively, and will mature within the subsequent three-year period.

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